Bike Breakthrough: Connecting Neighborhoods with Low-Stress Routes


| 11/1/2017 8:34:00 AM


mother-kids 

Photo by Planetgordon

For me, a good bike ride is both relaxing and stimulating — a chance to revel in the passing scenery as I feel the wind blow across my face. But I never expected to experience this in New York City. Navigating Brooklyn and a bit of Manhattan on two wheels for the first time was a sublime surprise. Instead of constantly peering over my shoulder fearful of cars speeding toward me (as I expected), I actually savored the street life all around while pedaling through town.

What made this ride so pleasurable and surprising is a well-connected grid of safe and comfortable bike routes featuring protected bike lanes on busy avenues and painted lanes on quieter streets. Built over the last decade as part of a methodical plan to improve biking in New York,  this network explains Brooklyn’s doubling of bike commuters over just five years, 2009-2014.

Those 10,000 new bike-commuting Brooklynites, not to mention the tens of thousands of others in the borough who now bike for shorter errands and social trips, are more than a trend.



They're a model.

moecknoeck
9/18/2018 4:39:25 PM

Living in a densely populated city I have a lot of experiences with the menace of rude and inconsidxerate cyclists who, even if there are wide bike lanes, rather love to use the sidewalk, endagering, even ramming pedestrians, and are getting off without remorse. Just look at the last picture of this article: How do you think are pedestrians able to cross the street when a two-direction bike fastlane makes it extremely dangerous for the pedstrians to even dare to cross. (cf. https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/sep/18/cyclist-charlie-alliston-jailed-for-18-months-over-death-of-pedestrian ) No cyclists thinks abot the kinetic energy s/he creates even in slow cycling the impulse of which is transmitted wholley on the pedestrian. Seriously, we need far less, not more cycling.


moecknoeck
9/17/2018 5:17:38 PM

Living in a densely populated city I have a lot of experiences with the menace of rude and inconsidxerate cyclists who, even if there are wide bike lanes, rather love to use the sidewalk, endagering, even ramming pedestrians, and are getting off without remorse. Just look at the last picture of this article: How do you think are pedestrians able to cross the street when a two-direction bike fastlane makes it extremely dangerous for the pedstrians to even dare to cross. (cf. https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/sep/18/cyclist-charlie-alliston-jailed-for-18-months-over-death-of-pedestrian ) No cyclists thinks abot the kinetic energy s/he creates even in slow cycling the impulse of which is transmitted wholley on the pedestrian. Seriously, we need far less, not more cycling.


moecknoeck
9/17/2018 5:16:50 PM

Living in a densely populated city I have a lot of experiences with the menace of rude and inconsidxerate cyclists who, even if there are wide bike lanes, rather love to use the sidewalk, endagering, even ramming pedestrians, and are getting off without remorse. Just look at the last picture of this article: How do you think are pedestrians able to cross the street when a two-direction bike fastlane makes it extremely dangerous for the pedstrians to even dare to cross. (cf. https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2017/sep/18/cyclist-charlie-alliston-jailed-for-18-months-over-death-of-pedestrian ) No cyclists thinks abot the kinetic energy s/he creates even in slow cycling the impulse of which is transmitted wholley on the pedestrian. Seriously, we need far less, not more cycling.